MUCH TOO LONG FOR INFO

I must admit that I do have some favourite topics that do make me think that the words equality and inclusion are just tthrow away terms to make some organisations look good and respectable. The same plus others also like to put their own slants and definitions on accessibility and alternative formats where they think the use of these terms is enough to show that they are being good and open.

It is really disappointing – no I mean annoying to still see large organisations not adhering to their legal duty to supply information in appropriate alternative formats. Where the small restaurant down the road may be going far and beyond its legal duty to make their menus accessible, the large hospital around the corner does not and will not sendpatients letter in larger font sizes or in Braille/Audio because they argue they don’t know how or need to do it.

In addition to this, many people are missing out on crucial inforamtion say in regards to an appointment or a benefit claim because organisations like the DWP keep going back on supplying information in appropriate and requested formats. Whereas on the one hand, these organisations are very strict on guidelines and proceedures, they cannot on the other, do their legal duty to enable people to follow their own regulations. Many, in the past, have been penalised for missing appointments or supply information because requests have come out in inappropriate formats.

Just think, if letters were sent out to a vast majority of people in another language or script, imagine what the feedback would be and how this amongst other organisations would move heavan and earth to put things right. Why then, after many years of knowing their is a problem, can they not do it for many visually impaired customers.

Receiving information in an appropriate format is a right and should not be down to the whim of someone within an office who does not have the awareness of the needs of others. Additionally, we should not be held to ransom with this right simply because an organisations says it cannot afford it or its computer systems are incompatible. The only things that are incompatable in these cases is the awareness of those who need to implement our legal rights within these organisations.

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